In the 1971 revolutionary essay “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?”, Linda Nochlin investigates the institutional limitations that have prevented women from being equal participants in art history, as well as the many ways that women have historically been marginalised.
One of the obvious reasons was that until the 19th century women were not allowed to obtain a higher education. When they were finally permitted to study art, they were not allowed to attend live drawing sessions from a nude models, which was an essential chapter of an artist’s education in the 19th century. This forced those few women who actually studied to focus on subjects that were lower in the hierarchy of artistic values like still life or landscape. If we add to this life circumstances like poverty, social duties, family obligations and children carrying, it is no surprise that women had much smaller chances to reach to the same level as their male contemporaries.
Nochlin encourages art institutions and historians to probe deeper into this inequity, and she believes that by doing so we can positively shape the future of arts as a whole.
Now, over 50 years since the essay’s publication, we are finally starting to see global trends toward greater diversity, with particular attention given to liberating art history and other cultural narratives from the Western white male perspective. That being said, art history is nonlinear, and it often unfolds in leaps and bounds. Some female artists have been able to overcome the prejudices against their sex and leave their mark in the world of art, while others are still hidden in the shadows of history.
One such artist is Katsushika Oi, daughter of famed ukiyo-e master Hokusai. We are delighted to announce that ONA will be hosting a series of exhibitions inspired by her life and work from September to December 2022, which we have entitled “汽水域 Kisuiiki”.
Katsushika Oi was an artist herself, and she was closely involved in her father’s art practice through the many years of his career. Her exceptional technical skill and unique way of seeing the world—including her sensitivity and female perspective—helped her to create her own original style, in addition to contributing to many works Hokusai created. For instance, there might be Oi's hands merged into Hokusai's painted waves. In this sense, Hokusai's water is like the estuary of Sumida River: kisui, the merging of freshwater and seawater.
Nevertheless, we know so little about Oi’s work and life, for after her father’s death she disappeared and only few of her paintings survived. How much of her life and work was inspired by Hokusai? How much of her story can be an inspiration for a new generation of female artists?
For 汽水域/Kisuiiki, we sought to answer these questions by inviting four contemporary female artists—Yulia Skogoreva, Yumi Arai, Aduki Kon, and Hanna Saito—to dive in and commingle with the "waters" of Oi's story.
Each artist will be given a solo show, during which she will present works exploring diverse subject matters such as “father and daughter relationships”, “art and domestic space”, “femininity”, and “magic”. The four exhibitions will look back in to the past at the same time as they gaze forward into the future. We aim to find a harmony and resonance between contemporary female artists who are based in Japan, and we hope to create a space that will be like kisuiiki—a meeting point of the past and the present, of the self and the other. 
The project will run from September to December, with one artist hosting their work each month. Please note that each artist will also conduct one workshop during the exhibition period, during which members of the public will be invited to participate in our explorations as well.

Organised by: ONA project room​​​​​​​, Sumi-Yume Executive Committee, Sumida City
Supported by: TOKYO BYOKANE CO.,LTD., TOBU RAILWAY CO.,LTD.,
Arts Council Tokyo, Tokyo Metropolitan Foundation for History and Culture.


1971年に発表されたアメリカ人美術史家リンダ・ノクリンによる革命的なエッセイ「なぜ偉大な女性芸術家がいなかったのか」では、女性が美術史に対等に参加することを妨げてきた制度上の制約と、なぜ女性が疎外されてきたかを検証しています。
その理由のひとつに、19世紀まで女性が高等教育を受けることが許されなかったかった時代背景が深く関わっています。19世紀当時には芸術家の必須科目であったヌードモデルによるデッサンを受けることが許されませんでした。そのため、実際に学んだ数少ない女性たちは、静物や風景など芸術的価値のヒエラルキーが低い題材に集中せざるを得なかったのです。さらに、貧困、社会的義務、家事・育児などの生活環境が加われば、当時の女性が男性のような高みに到達するチャンスがはるかに少なかったのは言うまでもありません。ノクリンは、芸術機関や歴史家にこの不公平をより深く追求するよう奨励し、そうすることで芸術全体の未来を明るく形作ることができると信じているのです。
このエッセイの発表から50年以上経った今、私たちはようやく美術史をはじめとする文化的な物語を西洋白人男性を中心とした視点から解放することに注目し、より多様性を求める世界的な潮流が見え始めています。しかしながら、美術史は境界がなく、しばしば飛躍的に展開されます。性に対する偏見を克服し、芸術の世界に足跡を残した女性アーティストもいれば、いまだ歴史の陰に隠れている女性アーティストもいるのです。

浮世絵師として有名な北斎の娘、葛飾応為もその一人です。今回オナプロジェクトルームでは2022年9月から12月にかけて、彼女の生涯とその仕事に触発され構成した展覧シリーズ「汽水域 Kisuiiki」を開催いたします。
葛飾応為は自身も芸術家であり、父・葛飾北斎の長年の画業に深く関わってきました。その卓越した技術力と、女性ならではの視点や感性で独自のスタイルを確立し、北斎の作品に多大な貢献をしました。言うなれば、北斎の描いた波の中に、彼女の痕跡が紛れ込んでいるのかもしれません。その意味で、北斎の水は隅田川の河口のように、淡水と海水が混じり合った「汽水」と表すことができるのではないでしょうか。

しかし、北斎の死後、彼女は姿を消し絵も僅かにしか残っていないため、その作品や生涯についてはほとんどわかっていません。彼女の人生と作品のどれだけが北斎の影響を受けていか、彼女の物語が新世代の女性芸術家にとってどれほどのインスピレーションとなり得るのでしょうか。
本展示「汽水域 Kisuiiki」では、4人の現代女性アーティストユーリア・ スコーゴレワ、荒井佑実、近あづき、齋藤 帆奈が応為の物語の”水”へ飛び込み、混ざり合います。
各アーティストは個展を開催し、「父と娘の関係」「アートと家庭」「女性性」「魔術」などをテーマにした作品を発表します。全4回の展覧会は、過去を振り返るとともに、未来に目を向けたものとなっています。日本を拠点に活動する現代女性アーティストの多様な活動が共鳴し合い、自己と他者、過去と現在が出会う「汽水域」のような空間を目指します。
本プロジェクトは9月から12月の4ヶ月に渡り毎月1名のアーティストが個展を開催します。また、会期中には各アーティストによる参加型のワークショップを実施いたします。
 主催:ONA project room、「隅田川 森羅万象 墨に夢」実行委員会
共催:墨田区  
協賛:株式会社東京鋲兼, 東武鉄道株式会社
※ 「隅田川 森羅万象 墨に夢」実行委員会 事務局は(公財)墨田区文化振興財団が担っています。


Kisuiiki program schedule:

Organ, 2008



よるのとばり Robe of night
Aduki Kon
25/11/2022 - 27/11/2022

Details coming soon

茯苓と絵師の娘
Poria cocos and the painter's daughter
Hanna Saito
09/12/2022 - 11/12/2022

Details coming soon


Back to Top